January Meeting Summary

Here’s a quick look back at the January meeting –

We reviewed 3 applications for demo permits; this begins the process of demolition review by our committee. We reviewed applications submitted by the residents at 78 Cotting Street, and by property owners at 17 Edward Street and 64 Court Street and found them complete.

We also voted to find both 28 Chester Street and 93 Wason Street not historically significant, so their demolition permits have been granted and they will proceed with their plans.

The house, already under redevelopment at 160 Forest St was found to be NOT preferably preserved by a unanimous vote.

The house at 33 Third Street was found to be historically significant by a vote of 4 to 1. At our February Meeting we will decide whether this building is also preferably preserved.

February Meeting Materials

We have a number of cases to review this month. In this post, you will find a number of inventory forms and related reports that the Commission uses to make its determinations. We will post our agenda on Wednesday after it is filed.

Neighborhood context reports can be found here: MHC Survey Plans and Neighborhood Overviews

33 Third Street Public Hearing:

The Thompson-Sinclair House was determined significant at our last meeting. The Medford Historical Commission will hold a public hearing to determine if the demolition of the building would be detrimental to the City of Medford. Public participation in the hearing is encouraged.

78 Cotting Street as seen from a recent Zillow view.

78 Cotting Street Application Materials:

This building has a colorful history dating back to the early nineteenth century. The land was once owned by members of the Adams family of Braintree/Quincy. The farm is referenced in several of their correspondence and was constructed before the 1850s. Stylistically, it is a great example of early building efforts in the Hillside neighborhood.

The Cotting Street Area Form provides a bit of information about the streetscape and how the lane got its name. There’s loads of information on all the houses on the street.

17 Edwards Street Application Materials:

17 Edwards Street is part of a collection of Victorian end houses that were constructed by the same developer at the end of the nineteenth century. The building has been stripped of its asbestos siding, revealing original detail and character from its original construction. The Commission will be determining significance at its next meeting.

This building has a striking resemblance to another end house we reviewed years ago. 6 Rockwell (since demolished) was the subject of a six-month demolition delay. Efforts to find a mover to relocate the building failed so it was extensively documented before demolition. The information gleaned can help us learn more about Edwards Street and other properties of similar vintage.

64 Court Street Application Materials:

Up for consideration is this small nineteenth-century building which will be altered beyond recognition. The building has many articulations in its complex massing which give it a fair degree of character. The Commission will determine significance at the next meeting.

St. Clements School at 595 Boston Avenue:

The Community Preservation Committee has requested the Commission determine if the St. Clements Elementary School at 595 Boston Avenue is significant. The Commission will make the determination based on the area form which was prepared for the church campus.

We encourage everyone to write in comments to us about these proposed projects. We take them into consideration when making our determinations. Please email us using the contact form on our website. If you just want to listen in, most of our meetings are live-streamed on the community channel and available after the fact on their website.

January Agenda

Here’s the agenda for the first meeting of the year, with Zoom details included. Join us! And start 2022 with a look back at some interesting buildings, and a look forward, to where Medford is headed in the new year. We have planned one vote on “preferably preserved,” 3 votes on “historical significance” and review of 2 new applications. With so many cases, we’ll be all over the map – Hillside, Fulton Heights, Wellington, Forest Street and South Medford.

December Applications

At our December meeting the MHC voted to accept three applications for demolition review – this simply means that we have reviewed the application and found it to be complete and sufficient to begin the demolition review process. When we accept applications, this DOES NOT mean that demolition permits will be granted.

Now, the case can advance to the next stage, which is demolition review. After an application is accepted, a Form B, prepared by our contracted architectural historians, will be prepared for the property in question. The commissioners will review the form and, at the meeting of the following month, decide whether or not the property is historically significant.

If it is historically significant, the property will be reviewed at a third meeting, to determine if the property is preferably preserved.

This month, applications were accepted for demolition review for properties at –

93 Wason Street, where the application was submitted by East Coast Buyers LLC of West Babylon NY;

28 Chester Avenue, where the application was submitted by Moacir Fihlo and Quinn Bushe of Medford, MA; and

33 Third Street, where the application was submitted by owner/occupant Chung Lee.

For further news of these cases, look for them to appear on the agenda next month, when we will vote on historical significance.

October 2021 Agenda

We will be making a number of demolition decisions this month: first on the agenda, the Historical Commission will be determining whether the home at 75 Clewley Road is preferably preserved. We will also be voting on whether properties at 29 Summer Street, 209 Park Street and 290 Salem Street are historically significant. And we will be reviewing applications for demolition for properties at Third Street and Manning Street.